Tuesday, December 27, 2016

'Late effects' of cancer treatment

A 12/25/16 Washington Post article examines "late effects" of cancer treatment:

One of medicine's greatest successes is the sharp rise in survival rates for children with cancer. But the flip side of that success is that many of those children are turning up years or even decades later with serious and sometimes life-threatening complications, including second cancers, heart disorders, cognitive problems and infertility.

"These treatments seem to accelerate the aging process," said <Dr.> Greg Aune, a researcher and pediatric oncologist who works at a clinic for childhood cancer survivors at University Hospital in San Antonio.

Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>> http://conta.cc/2hhhJPZ

Saturday, December 17, 2016

Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease

Published by the New England Journal of Medicine on 12/15/16, the authors describe their study methodology:

Using a polygenic score of DNA sequence polymorphisms, we quantified genetic risk for coronary artery disease in three prospective cohorts - 7814 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, 21,222 in the Women's Genome Health Study (WGHS), and 22,389 in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS) - and in 4260 participants in the cross-sectional BioImage Study for whom genotype and covariate data were available. We also determined adherence to a healthy lifestyle among the participants using a scoring system consisting of four factors: no current smoking, no obesity, regular physical activity, and a healthy diet.

The authors conclude:

Across four studies involving 55,685 participants, genetic and lifestyle factors were independently associated with susceptibility to coronary artery disease. Among participants at high genetic risk, a favorable lifestyle was associated with a nearly 50% lower relative risk of coronary artery disease than was an unfavorable lifestyle.